Managing Employee Creativity and Health in Nursing Homes: The Moderating Role of Matching Job Resources and Matching Occupational Rewards

TitleManaging Employee Creativity and Health in Nursing Homes: The Moderating Role of Matching Job Resources and Matching Occupational Rewards
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsdeJonge, Jan, Gevers, Josette, and Dollard, Maureen
JournalInternational Journal of Stress Management
Volume21
Issue4
Pagination361 - 383
Date Published2014
Keywordsemployee creativity, health care workers, job demands, nursing homes, occupational rewards, stress, worker health
Abstract

Health care staff in nursing homes are facing increasingly high job demands at work, which can have a detrimental impact on their health and work motivation. The Demand-Induced Strain Compensation (DISC) Model offers a theoretical framework to study how matching job resources and matching occupational rewards can buffer the adverse effects of high job demands. The aim of this study is to test the moderating role of matching job resources and matching occupational rewards in the relation between corresponding job demands and employee creativity and adverse health (i.e., emotional exhaustion and physical health complaints). A cross-sectional survey study was conducted among 184 health care workers from a nursing home in The Netherlands. Hierarchical regression analyses showed the proposed 3-way interaction effects of matching cognitive job resources and matching cognitive occupational rewards on the relation between cognitive job demands and employee creativity. In general, findings showed more moderating effects of job resources than of occupational rewards. In line with DISC theory, it is recommended that employers provide health care workers with those job resources that match the type of job demands concerned, conditioned by matching occupational rewards.